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Reblogged from africanfashion  550 notes
rtamerica:

Revealed: US operating secretly in Somalia since 2007 | RT News
American military advisers have been operating secretly in Somalia since around 2007, a revelation that shows the United States has had a presence in the African country for years without acknowledging the situation publicly.
The latest details provided by a Reuters report reveals that the American presence in Somalia stretches all the way back to the administration of George W. Bush, with advisers now stationed in multiple locations throughout the country.
When the United States announced in January that it had sent some advisers to Somalia back in October 2013, it was widely recognized as the first time American troops had been sent to the country since the “Black Hawk Down” operation in 1993. It’s clear now, however, that military officials have been there for several years, and a State Department official told the news service they now believe acknowledging their presence would not endanger their lives.
(Read Full Text)

rtamerica:

Revealed: US operating secretly in Somalia since 2007 | RT News

American military advisers have been operating secretly in Somalia since around 2007, a revelation that shows the United States has had a presence in the African country for years without acknowledging the situation publicly.

The latest details provided by a Reuters report reveals that the American presence in Somalia stretches all the way back to the administration of George W. Bush, with advisers now stationed in multiple locations throughout the country.

When the United States announced in January that it had sent some advisers to Somalia back in October 2013, it was widely recognized as the first time American troops had been sent to the country since the “Black Hawk Down” operation in 1993. It’s clear now, however, that military officials have been there for several years, and a State Department official told the news service they now believe acknowledging their presence would not endanger their lives.

(Read Full Text)


nuanced-subversion:
"One of the supposed characteristics of primitive peoples was that we could not use our minds or our intellects. We could not invent things, we could not create institutions or history, we could not imagine, we could not produce anything of value…we did not practice the ‘arts’ of civilization. By lacking such virtues we disqualified ourselves, not just from civilization but from humanity itself. In other words we were not ‘fully human’…Imperialism provided the means through which concepts of what counts as human could be applied systematically as forms of classification…In conjunction with imperial power and with ‘science’, these classification systems came to shape relations between imperial powers and indigenous societies.
The European powers had by the nineteenth century already established systems of rule and forms of social relations which governed interaction with the indigenous peoples being colonized. These relations were gendered, hierarchical and supported by rules, some explicit and others masked or hidden. The principle of ‘humanity’ was one way in which the implicit or hidden rules could be shaped. To consider indigenous peoples as not fully human, or not human at all, enabled distance to be maintained and justified various policies of either extermination or domestication.”
— Linda Tuhiwai Smith | Decolonizing Methodologies

nuanced-subversion:

"One of the supposed characteristics of primitive peoples was that we could not use our minds or our intellects. We could not invent things, we could not create institutions or history, we could not imagine, we could not produce anything of value…we did not practice the ‘arts’ of civilization. By lacking such virtues we disqualified ourselves, not just from civilization but from humanity itself. In other words we were not ‘fully human’…Imperialism provided the means through which concepts of what counts as human could be applied systematically as forms of classification…In conjunction with imperial power and with ‘science’, these classification systems came to shape relations between imperial powers and indigenous societies.

The European powers had by the nineteenth century already established systems of rule and forms of social relations which governed interaction with the indigenous peoples being colonized. These relations were gendered, hierarchical and supported by rules, some explicit and others masked or hidden. The principle of ‘humanity’ was one way in which the implicit or hidden rules could be shaped. To consider indigenous peoples as not fully human, or not human at all, enabled distance to be maintained and justified various policies of either extermination or domestication.”

Linda Tuhiwai Smith | Decolonizing Methodologies

The Middle Passage journey from West Africa to the Americas took 4 to 6 months. By

Try walking around without wiping your butt for a day or a week. Yep now try laying down in shit for 4-6 weeks, most of it isnt your own. Then add some blood and some mucus. Then grab some chains. Slavery was that bad. dont u ever fucking tell me it wasnt! (via howtobenoladarling)

Not to mention every now and then you were raped by those that were working the ships.  Male and female were raped.

(via theafrosistuh)

24 hrs laying in extremely tight positions with hundreds of people that are suffering from all kinds of diseases due to malnutrition. Weather wasnt always the way the ship owners planned and voyages took longer than usually, the longest I was told by a professor was a whole year. 

(via madonnawhorereject)

Most people have no idea what happened to our ancestors, and that’s due to the fact that the powers that be want to act like it never happened.  

(via paranoidsuperhero)

Reblogging some real shit from my Liked posts. Because fuck you.

(via bludclotartattack)

And let’s add on the fact that ships have to make port and re-supply and between Africa and America lay the Caribbean and South America, which still took a great deal more to travel to. So families were separated not only by death and torment, but by members being sold off on a different continent than where they might have been bound.

Not to mention ships get blown off course, and the slave next to you might have died and you have to sleep next to a corpse for who knows how long before the crew finally decides to handle it and toss it overboard like so much offal.

Sharks still follow the course of the slave trade ships till this day due to the amount of offal and human bodies that were tossed overboard in the ship’s wake.

(via thegoddamazon)

(Damn is that last thing about sharks true?!)

Yes. They threw so many bodies overboard it changed the ecological feeding patterns of sharks. They follow the slave ships from dock to port. They were even used as an act of terrorism to force Africans on to ships and encourage them not to commit suicide. Slave ships were often packed for collateral damage. It was estimated that many would not make the journey and all those bodies thrown overboard were insured. That’s how insurance companies got their start… It’s also how many families built their family fortune.


This was a business.

(via howtobeterrell)

(via face—the—strange)

(via whiteguiltconfessionals)

(via elegantly-tasteless)

http://africa-makanaka.tumblr.com

(via africa-makanaka)

Reblogged from cutefoshowithanafro  211 notes

The Negro boy has obstacles, discouragements, and temptations to battle with that are little known to those not situated as he is. When a white boy undertakes a task, it is taken for granted that he will succeed. On the other hand , people are usually surprised if the Negro boy does not fail. In a word, the Negro youth starts out with the presumption against him. By

Booker T. Washington

It’s crazy how he wrote these words over a 100 years ago and they are still true today.  Smh.

(via thefear2012)